Update on New Street Drugs | Banyan Treatment Centers Boca

New Street Drugs You Should know About

street drugs
 

New street drugs hit the market every once in a while, bringing along with them new cases of addiction and health problems.

New street drugs hit the market every once in a while, bringing along with them new cases of addiction and health problems. But no matter how many new substances hit the market, it seems as if there’s always another one that’s next in line. From over-the-counter substances to abused prescription drugs, it’s not always easy to recognize the dangers of a drug. Following COVID-19 and considering the current opioid epidemic the United States is in, many people have become reliant on drugs and alcohol. To help you stay informed, our drug and alcohol treatment center in Boca is sharing a list of new street drugs you should know about.


The Rise of New Dangerous Street Drugs


Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, people have turned to drugs like alcohol, marijuana, and anti-anxiety medications to alleviate their worries. While club drugs like MDMA and cocaine dropped slightly as a result of social distancing guidelines, psychedelics like PCP, LSD, and shrooms also rose in popularity. However, there are also drug trends that existed before the pandemic that has also worsened. For example, drugs laced with fentanyl have become more common in the street drug market, as well as prescription drugs like benzos. Below is an overview of drug trends according to a COVID-19 edition of the Global Drug Survey that was held in 2020:1


  • There was a 46 percent increase in marijuana use in the U.S.
  • MDMA use dropped by 41 percent due to social distancing guidelines
  • Cocaine use dropped by 38 percent due to social distancing guidelines
  • Ketamine use dropped by 34 percent due to social distancing guidelines
  • Magic mushrooms and LSD use increased by about 20 percent

As the restrictions of the pandemic are easing in certain areas of the world, certain illicit substances may regain their popularity. Banyan Boca offers residential addiction treatment that has helped many individuals who have become dependent on drugs and alcohol recover from their addiction and get sober.


8 New Street Drugs You Should Know About in 2021


Below are some new drugs on the street that were either fueled by the pandemic or remain under wraps until traveling and social distancing restrictions are lifted. Here are eight new popular street drugs as well as their side effects, symptoms of overdose, and helpful addiction resources.


Fantasy (GHB)


GHB (Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate) - also called G, Fantasy, Liquid Ecstasy, and The New Ice - has become a dangerously popular drug both abroad and in the U.S. in the past few years. GHB is a central nervous system depressant that’s commonly thought of as a club drug or a date rape drug. Xyrem is a brand-name prescription drug that contains the sodium salt of GHB and is used to treat conditions like narcolepsy and insomnia. Side effects of GHB like euphoria increased sex drive, and relaxation is the main reasons why this drug is abused. However, its numbing and sedative effects also make it a popular date rape drug. GHB abuse can lead to addiction in addition to other physical and psychological side effects. You can spot GHB by its appearance. It usually comes in the form of a white powder as well as a clear liquid form. This liquid form tastes slightly salty and is often mixed into alcohol or juice. Long-term abuse increases an individual’s tolerance as well as their chances of overdose.


Some common GHB overdose symptoms include:

  • Decreased heart rate
  • Lowered body temperature
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Unconsciousness
  • Seizures
  • Coma

Chronic GHB substance abuse can lead to a variety of health problems. While they aren’t clear, some long-term effects of GHB that can occur include addiction, respiratory disease, and heart problems. Individuals who abuse prescription drugs like GHB or have become dependent on drugs like this can get help at Banyan Treatment Centers Boca. We offer residential drug treatment in Boca that is suited for people who have severe addictions and require 24-hour care and individualized treatment.


Phenibut


Phenibut – also referred to as Anvifen, noofen, party powder, and pbut - was originally developed by the Soviet Union to aid cosmonauts in their missions. Phenibut is a central nervous system depressant that’s used to treat conditions like anxiety disorders and insomnia. You can usually spot it as a white capsule or pill, but it can also be injected. Although it’s legal to possess in the U.S., Phenibut is not approved as a licensed pharmaceutical drug by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Many people abuse this drug for its sedative side effects but neglect its other dangers. Phenibut can cause side effects like dizziness, nausea, poor balance, and addiction when taken for long periods of time.


Common Phenibut overdose symptoms also include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Drowsiness
  • Decreased blood pressure
  • Kidney failure
  • Difficulties breathing

How Long Do The Effects Of GHB Last?


How long the effects of GHB last and how quickly they kick in depends on how it’s taken. When taken orally, the effects of GHB usually begin within 10 and 20 minutes. Because GHB has a half-life of 30 to 50 minutes, half of the dose taken will be flushed out of a person’s system within this time frame.2 When it comes to GHB withdrawal, a person who’s become dependent on this drug may experience certain physical symptoms like insomnia, shaking, sweating, and psychosis. Withdrawal can be dangerous and life-threatening if a person attempts to quit using GHB on their own. We recommend a medically monitored detox for individuals who are struggling with drug addiction to ensure they safely get through the withdrawal process.


If combined with other CNS depressants, the side effects of Phenibut can become more severe.


Flakka (alpha-PHP)


Flakka (alpha-PHP) – also called Gravel, Zombie Drug, and Bath Salts – is a synthetic designer drug that acts as a stimulant by mimicking the effects of the khat plant. It produces a high similar to that of amphetamines or Ecstasy, but with more severe side effects. Flakka has become notorious for the zombie-like aggression and behavior it has induced in its users. One report claimed that a man was discovered eating another man’s face while high on bath salts like Flakka. Aside from the aggressive behavior, Flakka can also cause side effects like increased body temperature, kidney failure, and increased heart rate (tachycardia).

Flakka overdose symptoms you should look out for include:

  • Elevated heart rate
  • Agitation and aggressive behavior
  • Twitching or jerky muscle movements
  • Confusion
  • Heightened sensitivity to light, sound, and touch
  • Hallucinations
  • Paranoia
  • Delusions

Our medically monitored detox in Boca Raton is ideal for flushing drugs like Flakka out of a person’s system. Our detox programs are led by medical professionals who are equipped to administer medication as needed to help patients safely withdraw from drugs and alcohol.


Fentanyl


Fentanyl can go by many names, including Blue Dolphin, Apache, China Girl, Poison, Dance Fever, Fire Birria (Fentanyl and heroin), Speedball (Fentanyl and cocaine), Facebook (Fentanyl and heroin in capsules), and Goofball (Fentanyl and methamphetamine). Fentanyl use in the U.S. has increased as a result of the opioid epidemic that began in the 1990s. It’s a powerful synthetic opioid that’s nearly 100 times more potent than morphine. Not only can this be abused on its own, but its white powdery appearance and severe side effects make it a popular additive to use as a cutting agent in other drugs like cocaine, MDMA, heroin, benzos, and meth.


Despite the deadly side effects Fentanyl can cause, like drowsiness, confusion, shallow breathing, irregular heart rate, and confusion, people still abuse it. Long-term use of fentanyl and mixing it with other substances also increase the chances of experiencing overdose symptoms like:

  • Decreased blood pressure
  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Cold and clammy skin
  • Decreases heart rate
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Blue lips and fingernails (cyanosis)
  • Limp body

Banyan Treatment Centers Boca also offers prescription pill addiction treatment for individuals who become addicted to prescription drugs that contain Fentanyl, such as Xanax and Etizolam.


Kratom


The new street drug Kratom also goes by the names Herbal speedball, ithang, thorn, and biak biak. It’s a psychoactive herb that’s derived from the Mitragyna speciosa tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is commonly sold in gas stations, convenience stores, bodegas, and even in farmer’s markets under the guise of medical value. It usually comes in the form of a green powder or loose-leaf tea that can be ground up and put in capsules or brewed. The FDA advises people against any use of kratom due to its lack of medicinal value and dangers. Common side effects of Kratom include nausea, vomiting, liver damage, and addiction.


Common kratom overdose symptoms include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Chills
  • Sweating
  • Drowsiness
  • Hallucinations
  • Delusions
  • Confusion
  • Difficulties breathing
  • High blood pressure
  • Constipation
  • Difficulties urinating
  • Dry mouth
  • Seizures
  • Coma

Carfentanil


Carfentanil, also known as Wildnil and Serial Killer, is an analog of fentanyl, meaning it mimics the effects of fentanyl. Because carfentanil and fentanyl produce similar side effects, the former is one of the many new street drugs that have contributed to addiction in the U.S. Carfentanil is commonly used to sedate large animals like horses and elephants, so it’s no surprise that it’s one of the most potent drugs in the U.S. It’s 10,000 times more dangerous than morphine and 1,000 more powerful than fentanyl.


Just 0.02 mg of carfentanil can produce overdose symptoms like:

  • Pinpoint pupils
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Unresponsiveness
  • Limp body
  • Awake but unable to speak
  • Bluish or grayish skin
  • Blue lips, fingernails, and skin
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Choking sounds (“death rattle”)
  • Shallow or slow breathing

Despite its dangers, people still abuse carfentanil because of the high it produces and because it’s cheaper and more potent than drugs like heroin. Carfentanil is also mixed with heroin and cocaine to produce a drug called “gray death”, which increases the risk of overdose. If you or someone you know has become addicted to opioids, our opioid treatment can help.


Krokodil


“Krokodil” is Russian for “crocodile”, and is known for the blackish and greenish skin discoloration it produces in its users. Krokodil is a desomorphine that became popular in Europe and slowly made its way to the U.S. This desomorphine is an opioid derivative of codeine and can cause euphoria and sedative effects like other opioids. Those who use krokodil often experience side effects like skin ulcerations, skin infections, gangrene, and rotting flesh. While it’s known as an opioid, it also often contains ingredients like gasoline, paint thinner, or lighter fluid, and iodine.


Common overdose symptoms of krokodil include:

  • Pinpoint pupils
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Unresponsiveness
  • Limp body
  • Awake but unable to speak
  • Bluish or grayish skin
  • Green or blackened skin
  • Skin ulcerations
  • Blue lips, fingernails, and skin
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Choking sounds
  • Shallow or slow breathing
  • Coma

Krokodil is one of the many new illegal drugs on the street that are deadly and can produce a long list of adverse side effects. If you discover that a loved one is using this drug, get help immediately.


Gabapentin


Gabapentin is an anticonvulsant and nerve pain medication. Despite its medical purpose, recreational drug users abuse gabapentin to intensify the effects of or to replace opioids. It can come in the form of a pill or capsule that’s white or yellow. This is an especially dangerous drug trend considering the current opioid crisis in the nation.


Gabapentin can also cause overdose symptoms similar to those of opioids, including:

  • Pinpoint pupils
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Unresponsiveness
  • Limp body
  • Awake but unable to speak
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Choking sounds
  • Shallow or slow breathing
  • Coma


Be aware of the new street drug names and their dangers. If you or someone you know has become addicted to drugs or alcohol, call us now at 888-280-4763 to learn more about our addiction services in Boca Raton.


Get the help you need today at Banyan Boca Raton.

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Alyssa
Alyssa
Alyssa is Banyan’s Director of Digital Marketing & Technology. After overcoming her own struggles with addiction, she began working in the treatment field in 2012. She graduated from Palm Beach State College in 2016 with additional education in Salesforce University programs. A part of the Banyan team since 2016, Alyssa brings over 5 years of experience in the addiction treatment field.